Latest News

  • Apr.21, 2018:   Headed to Montreal to present WrisText and Jetto!

  • Apr.05, 2018:   Had a crazy winter working with so many brilliant minds! Submitted three papers to UIST’18.

  • Feb.09, 2018:   WrisText won CHI 2018 Honorable Mention Award!

  • Dec.15, 2017:   Two papers conditionally accepted at CHI’18!

Publications

We present WrisText - a one-handed text entry technique for smartwatches using the joystick-like motion of the wrist. A user enters text by whirling the wrist of the watch hand, towards six directions which each represent a key in a circular keyboard.
In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’18)

When virtual objects on the smartwatch display visually collide or push the edge of the screen, we add haptic feedback so that the user also feels the impact. This addition creates the illusion of a virtual object that is physically hitting or pushing the smartwatch, from within the device itself.
In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’18)

We present Pyro, a micro thumb-tip gesture recognition technique based on thermal infrared signals radiating from the fingers. Pyro uses a compact, low-power passive sensor, making it suitable for wearable and mobile applications.
In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST’17)

We propose a supplementary tactile feedback system to enhance the user experience on the smartwatch form factor. Our system has a deformable surface on the back of the watch face, allowing the visual scene on screen to extend into 2.5D physical space.
In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST’17)

We present Cito, a smartwatch that can move its face in five ways: rotation, hinge, translation, rising, and orbiting around the wrist. We describe how these movements enable new interactions unavailable in the current smartwatches.
In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI’17)

WristWhirl uses the wrist as an always-available joystick to perform one-handed continuous input on smartwatches. We explore the influence of the wrist’s bio-mechanical properties for performing gestures to interact with a smartwatch through a user study.
In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST’16)

Fun Projects

Teaching

I am a teaching assistant for the following courses at Dartmouth College:

  • Spring 2016: COSC 165 Smartphone Programming
  • Winter 2016: COSC 189 Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction
  • Fall 2015: COSC 175 Introduction to Bioinformatics

Contact